Thursday, April 21, 2005

The Chinese Government Reads the News Commentators

J

Japanese killing civilians in China during WWII

I know this is shouting into the wind but I grew up dealing with the Chinese leadership because my father and mother were often sent over there to do business and I assisted in NYC because I was near the UN as well as various consulates. I also fed them information because I had access to foreign newspapers that are sold in NYC.

Now we have the internet. My parents and I discovered that the Chinese leadership tracked us very closely for they would refer to things we said or wrote almost immediately. One time when the NY Daily News published an editorial by me concerning China, my mother recieved an angry call that same day as the ambassador demanded she get me to recind this offensive piece.

Even stray remarks are reported. When the Chinese leadership is interested in something, they track it very closely. One top item on this list is "how many Americans are fooled into believing China can ONLY trade with them?" idea. So far, so good. Even on liberal sites, this false information holds steady. Another item is the idea, "China doesn't want to challenge the status quo of the world". This is truly funny. The Chinese have to disguise their goal as much as possible. I am fortunate that they told me outright in 1982 what their goal was.

No one has to believe me. But world events will prove me right, as usual.

Right now, the Japanese are in the bull's eye of the Chinese leadership and every word, every gesture is carefully calibrated and weighed as the Chinese examine this troublesome neighbor. The feelings the Chinese have for the Japanese are strong. In the negative sense. The Japanese blythely talk down to the Chinese as if they are inferiors. So, today at a major newspaper, a top official attacks China head-on with THIS:

POINT OF VIEW /Kazuo Ogoura: Political immaturity spurs Japan-bashing

Wow. I suppose a direct slap in the face isn't enough, is it? Time for "Diplomacy for Dummies". IF the goal is WWIII, the Japanese are going about this in splendid fashion. IF the goal is to accomodate both the Chinese and the Koreans, this is not going to work.

Quite.

Heated relations are also fanned by some ``improper'' comments made by Japanese politicians about Japan's history and to the descriptions of that history in Japanese school textbooks.

Diplomacy for Dummies, Chapter 2: when you put quotation marks around your insults, implying that they are not really insulting, this doubles the insult! Enraging the other party further! The quotation marks implies that the "improper" comments were not really improper, only seemingly improper.

In other words, the anti-Japanese campaign is in fact a muffled or disguised political campaign against the present Chinese government and a way for the Chinese people to vent.

OK, I see. The angry Koreans and Chinese are not angry about Japanese war crimes or Japanese attitudes, it is really the people hating their own leaders! I wonder if this will be said in the faces of the Chinese leaders this next week? Wish I would be there to watch. Could be amusing.

In China, the ruling Communist Party has had difficulties in trying to find a new identity for the party after the adoption of the modernization policies. Therefore, it has had to rely more on nationalism in the sense of emphasizing historical Chinese traditions and national pride.

Heaven forbid the Chinese feel national pride! As for party identity, anyone looking at Japanese politics and the refusal to redistrict according to population has corrupted the government so badly it barely responds to any popular critics because you can't vote them out of office. Time for reform which never seems to happen.

In that sense, the basic cause of Japan-bashing in China and South Korea should not be attributed to the Japanese political attitude toward those countries. Nor should it be attributed wholly to political manipulation by the leadership of those two countries.

Note how, after arguing with himself, Kazuo Ogoura smugly says, "We are not at fault at all". Readers of Diplomacy for Dummies know this isn't going to fly any further than a plump pig.

any event, China and South Korea should realize that to make political use of anti-Japanese feelings is likely to be increasingly regarded in the rest of the world as symptoms of their political immaturity.

Japanese leaders, for their part, should be more sensitive to the impact of globalization in South Korea and China. They should be more careful in dealing with sensitive political issues with those countries.


Slap, slap, slap. This Japanese commentator can't resist. "Immaturity" indeed! The Chinese have shown great skill in the diplomatic realm. I note their progress through the world and it is pretty awesome. When Japan, pushed by America, decided on an open confrontation with China, the response was swift, popular and forceful. Calling the Chinese "immature" as Japan clings to the notion they are in a strong negotiating position means either we have a major war in Asia or Japan eats a crow feast as they are forced, in the end, to retract everything.

The Chinese leaders read this editorial today. This I guarantee. They are also extremely angry with the choice of words as well as the Japanese attitude of entitlement and superiority. This rankles more than anything. The Japanese, like the British, considered the Chinese to be subhuman. "No dogs or Chinese allowed" still burns in the minds of Chinese.

We will be seeing more action in Asia. This is going to get plenty ugly.

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